Impact of Modernism on Confucianism: A Critical Analysis

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Abdul Qayyum

Abstract

Modern Chinese philosophers’ thoughts and ideas, and their approaches towards adopting Western sociopolitical systems, democratic values and Western logic to synthesizing Chinese and Western ideas positively. Yan introduced Chinese intellectuals to the theories of evolution and capitalism, as well as to social and political ideas: liberty, democracy, legal systems, etc. Since the people were endowed with natural, non-transferable rights such as life, property and liberty, the reason they formed the state through social contract was to protect their natural rights. Without liberty, man and civilized society could not exist. In launching both the literary revolution and the new culture movement, Hu advocated one clear goal: to reject China’s old culture in favour of Western culture. The Western tricks no longer work now’. What China needed was a new culture based on Western Values, especially science, democracy and pragmatism.

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How to Cite
, A. Q. (2022). Impact of Modernism on Confucianism: A Critical Analysis. Al Qalam, 26(2), 299-308. https://doi.org/10.51506/al qalam.v26i2.1639

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